Thursday, June 14, 2018

What I learned from the NPR Raccoon


Move over soaps; forget daytime television shows, here comes the newest hit sensation: NPR Raccoon!

When I got wind that a raccoon was climbing the UBS building in St. Paul, Minnesota, I turned to the Internet just like thousands of other people.

At first, the raccoon’s notoriety was limited to ogling bystanders, but within a couple of hours cameras were positioned at every angle.  CNN and Fox News and all major networks were covering the mammal’s every move, the hashtag #nprraccoon started trending getting thousands of hits, and then we all held our breaths. 

Not knowing much about raccoons, I did a search online to find out what might have driven this furry little creature to act in such a way. One researcher stated, “…not sure if raccoons possess intelligence in a critical thinking way so much as an “insatiable curiosity” which leads them often enough to success.” Very interesting.

I’m currently in the throes of writing my next romance book and I need to take pointers from this little guy: don’t dwell too much on the critical thinking, just let my ‘insatiable curiosity’ be my drive. I need to write with reckless abandon.

Thank you NPR Raccoon for your inspiration!

Follow me here.

Here’s my site.


Maria 

Thursday, May 24, 2018

Why Writers Write

Recently, while doing research I found several excellent articles about women and writing. I also found a set of TedTalk podcasts from two well-known women writers, Isabel Allende and Amy Tan.
It was Ms. Tan’s account of childhood experiences and Ms. Allende’s Tales of Passion that got me thinking about how our experiences shape us and how they bleed into our own unique creative realm. As such, each story we weave has the potential to invoke a wide range of emotions in our readers.
As one would imagine writers from all walks of life have very different reasons for writing. Below is a common thread among modern day writers:

Leave a legacy
If you write a book well and publish it, you may actually leave something behind that can last forever.

Incite
Writers write what the world is like as they see it. Writers ask the difficult questions. And, this boundless curiosity is the foundation that opens the doors to discussing difficult topics.

To stay sane
To write the endings we wish to see in the world. To make peace with the things we cannot control.

Why do you write? 

Maria Cox

Wednesday, January 31, 2018

Galentine’s Day

For several weeks whenever I walk into a drugstore in Queens I'm subjected to an explosion of everything pink and red, this could only mean one thing: Valentine’s Day is around the corner.
The funny thing about Valentine's Day is that most of my adult life I have recognized the holiday as romantic in nature, but in recent years with the inclusion of friendship, I’ve come to appreciate Valentine’s Day as a general day of Love. In fact, I send Valentine’s Day cards to close family and friends (yes, I do!). 
Recently I got to thinking, how many women and men go out of their way to celebrate special people on this day. A lot, it would seem from an online search. One celebration which resonated with me the most was: Galentine’s Day.
What is Galentine’s Day, you ask? This term was coined a few years back by Leslie Knope - a fictional character from the popular sitcom Parks and Recreation. Leslie declared, “Every February 13th, my lady friends and I leave our husbands and our boyfriends at home, and we come and kick it, breakfast-style. Ladies celebrating ladies.” What a great concept.
In the spirit of Galentine’s Day I’m channeling Leslie Knope and suggest ways to celebrate:

* Brunch date with gal pals – send Evite
* Eat waffles – a Leslie Knope must!
* Exchange gifts – who doesn’t want gifts?
*Consume fizzy drinks – ok, so I’m partial to Merlot, but even I’ll drink a sugar-laden frou-frou drink for my lady friends

Whether you are taken, or happily detached, I’m sure you too can appreciate a different type of celebration. In fact, how about we declare February 15th Bromance Day?

Maria Cox

Source:
www.npr.org
www.hgtv.com